The time is now!

So they say. For most, “the time is now”, means that pretty soon we’d better get ready to try to act. Pretty soon, as in: not right now, but sometime soon.

Mindfulness is the word of the moment (get it?), “live in the present” is something we encourage and cajole our future selves to do, and yet things don’t get done.  They get thought about, planned, to-do listed…but done?

It’s time to start doing.  Share it, invite comment, see what others think, see if it works. I’ll go first.

When Selfish Is Good

If everyone prioritizes paying attention, even in “a good way”, to what others are doing, their goals and dreams, a team will not be at it’s best.

The word selfish has gotten a bad rep.  Being selfish in your preparation, doing everything you can to be at your best? That’s a great start to making your team better.

By being prepared and modeling the work you put in in selfish-mode you’ll be helping the team from the inside out.  The foundation of a team is it’s people, so be a great person/player/athlete and you’ll be doing your part.

It takes a great group effort to be a great team.  The existence of standards and norms that make up the basis of a team’s culture and the ethic of working together toward a commonly held goal is crucial to outcome success.  However, relying on a set of “great team players” that are not also at their best individually is not a recipe for success.

All teams must work together in a selfless way, but the individuals within should make it a priority to be selfish in their preparation.

Because That’s What You Do.

How many things are on your list, agenda or practice plan that are simply carryovers from yesterday, last week or your first year in this job?

What are the things that you do without question?

Why would you do anything without the simple question: “is this going to make me/us/the situation better?”

The absence of testing, or even just thinking about the purpose of some drills, exercises, ideas or plans, is prevalent. We tend to go with what we think we should do rather than those things that we know add value.

Too often it’s that fear of being different that keeps us from being, well, different.